Saturday, March 10, 2018

Legally dangerous tweet from Uganda circulating; (don't forward it)

A few weeks ago WJLA7 warned viewers about a child pornography video circulating on Facebook, and that it could be a crime to share it.  The video has surely been removed.

But today I saw in my Twitter feed a post whose title seemed to hint at c.p. filmed in Uganda.  The image in the video showed minimal dress but no nudity.  I simply ignored it as it passed out of sight, but I realized I could have (with a little more presence of mind) reported it and unfollowed the sender. 

Presumably it could be a crime to retweet such a post.  Just a warning or a tip. 

I don’t recall that this has happened in own input feed before.  Let’s hope someone reports it and that Twitter gets rid of it quickly. 

Thursday, March 08, 2018

Geek Squad appears to be working undercover with FBI in a cozy relationship at a repair center to nab child pornography possession

The Electronic Frontier Foundation, in a disturbing article by Aaron Mackey, reports that there was more collusion between a Geek Squad repair center in Kentucky and the FBI looking for child pornography, than had been thought.

Some employees seem to have gone out of the way to look for images in unallocated space, that the customer thought had been deleted.

There are tools that can detect digital watermarks from known images identified by NCMEC. But it is hard to imagine how one could find a “needle in a haystack” otherwise.

It would sound plausible to do this also with sex trafficking in the future (related to the FOSRA-SESTA debate).
In August 2014, I had a large Toshiba laptop crash with a burned out motherboard from overheating when trying to upgrade from Windows 8.0 to 8.1, as repeatedly prompted by Microsoft.  The computer was sent to the repair center and was there for six weeks before we gave up on it (the store said “Tennessee”).  I had to replace it and apply the service plan warranty to that replacement.

Update: March 11

A further report on admissions of payments to GS members.  

Tuesday, March 06, 2018

The question of porn, pirated and placed out of context -- reminds me of the COPA trial in 2007

Stoya has an op-ed in the New York Times Monday, March 5, 2018, p. A27, “Can there be good porn?
She discusses how adult content needs to be put in context – a discussion that I remember well from the COPA litigation of more than a decade ago. But then it gets pirated, she says, out of context, posted “for free” on YouTube, and discovered by kids out of context.
But even when found in its original location, many people will not bother to read the context.

Saturday, March 03, 2018

FOSTA passage and the "should have known" standard

Note well the Wall Street Journal editorial “Political Sex-Trafficking Exploitation”, with the byline “Fast moving legislation could open the web to a lawsuit bonanza, link
WSJ admits that Backpage should have been prosecuted under existing law, which really does exempt criminal activity by websites or service providers that they know about from downstream liability protection. A judge In Boston will let another case go forward.
But all the rub is with the “should have known” idea, already put forth by EFF.